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APRS promotes the care of all of Scotland’s rural landscapes.

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APRS Office – update 18 March 2020
Due to the Covid-19 outbreak the APRS Office is now closed until further notice.
All staff will be working from home and can be contacted by email:
Policy, Planning & Communications:  John Mayhew, Director  john@aprs.scot 
Membership & Administration:  Nina Sobecka, Administrator  info@aprs.scot
Have You Got The Bottle? Campaign:  Jenni Hume, Campaign Manager  jenni@haveyougotthebottle.org.uk
APRS Green Belts Alliance:  Nikki Sinclair, Consultant  nikki@aprs.scot
While the office is closed all APRS meetings will either be cancelled or held by video conference – please check back for further updates.
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Read our Press Release marking the 20th anniversary of the passing of the National Parks (Scotland) Act.

Leading The Way – how National Parks and other protected landscapes could help rural Scotland to recover from the effects of the virus

Watch our 2019 Annual Review video – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XpHIaS_pyaE

Space Hub Sutherland – our letter of objection to Highland Council

Join The Association for the Protection of Rural Scotland

Join APRS and support Scotland’s rural landscapes. Members have access to specialist Advice, Newsletters and regular e-Bulletins.

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**BE CONSIDERATE**
With many more people now travelling to enjoy the hills, we have been made aware of instances of inconsiderate parking in busy areas near popular Munros.

Please think of others when you park your car and avoid causing any obstruction by blocking access to driveways, entrances to fields and buildings or making it difficult for others to use a road/track.

If an area is so busy that you're finding parking difficult, you may want to consider going somewhere with less people to avoid potential exposure to coronavirus.

You can read more about the Scottish Outdoor Access Code here - there will be a quiz on this next week!
www.outdooraccess-scotland.scot/practical-guide-all/out-and-about/car-parking

#BePrepared #StaySafe #BeConsiderate #BeCOVIDaware

Glenmore Lodge Invercauld Estate Balmoral Castle & Estate Scottish Mountain Rescue NTS Glencoe NTS Glenfinnan Monument Scottish Natural Heritage Loch Lomond & The Trossachs National Park VisitCairngorms Ramblers Scotland John Muir Trust Stirling Council The Highland Council VisitScotland
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Celebrating 20 Years of National Parks in Scotland

On 5 July 2000 the Scottish Parliament passed the National Parks (Scotland) Act, so Sunday 5 July 2020 marked twenty years since that significant occasion. The Act enabled the designation of National Parks in Scotland and set out their aims, functions and powers. Two National Parks have been designated under the Act: the Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park in 2002 and the Cairngorms National Park in 2003.

Two Decades of Achievement

The Act has proved its worth through the achievements of our first two National Parks. They have brought great benefits to their areas, by repairing mountain paths, conserving native woodlands, supporting local businesses, generating jobs for young people, enabling affordable housing, investing in sustainable rural development and growing the tourism industry; all this whilst protecting the beauty of the landscapes for both local people and visitors. Increasingly, they play leading roles in tackling the climate emergency and nature crisis, for example through peatland restoration and species recovery programmes.

National Parks and Rural Recovery

National Parks and our other protected landscapes have built up expertise over the years in encouraging and facilitating healthy outdoor recreation and sustainable economic and social development. They are therefore ideally placed to lead the recovery of rural Scotland following the coronavirus epidemic, including by encouraging domestic tourism. New National Parks would provide exactly the type of stimulus needed to lead fragile rural areas out of the current crisis towards future prosperity.

Unfinished Business

In 2006-2007 the then Scottish Executive prepared proposals for a Coastal and Marine National Park, which would have been Scotland’s third. In 2008 Harris residents voted in favour of their island becoming a National Park. In 2013 APRS and the Scottish Campaign for National Parks (SCNP) published our landmark report "Unfinished Business" which set out why Scotland should have more National Parks and proposed at least seven more: Galloway; the Borders; Ben Nevis/Glen Coe/Black Mount, a Coastal and Marine National Park centred on Mull; Glen Affric; Harris; and Wester Ross.

Scotland has an incredible wealth of world-class landscapes; to make the most of these, many more should be National Parks.
National Parks are ideally placed to lead the way out of the current health crisis towards a better, more prosperous Scotland. This 20th anniversary would be the perfect time to create more National Parks as a brilliant way to tackle the climate emergency and the nature crisis.
... See MoreSee Less

Celebrating 20 Years of National Parks in Scotland

On 5 July 2000 the Scottish Parliament passed the National Parks (Scotland) Act, so Sunday 5 July 2020 marked twenty years since that significant occasion.  The Act enabled the designation of National Parks in Scotland and set out their aims, functions and powers.  Two National Parks have been designated under the Act:  the Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park in 2002 and the Cairngorms National Park in 2003.

Two Decades of Achievement

The Act has proved its worth through the achievements of our first two National Parks. They have brought great benefits to their areas, by repairing mountain paths, conserving native woodlands, supporting local businesses, generating jobs for young people, enabling affordable housing, investing in sustainable rural development and growing the tourism industry; all this whilst protecting the beauty of the landscapes for both local people and visitors.  Increasingly, they play leading roles in tackling the climate emergency and nature crisis, for example through peatland restoration and species recovery programmes.  

National Parks and Rural Recovery

National Parks and our other protected landscapes have built up expertise over the years in encouraging and facilitating healthy outdoor recreation and sustainable economic and social development.  They are therefore ideally placed to lead the recovery of rural Scotland following the coronavirus epidemic, including by encouraging domestic tourism.  New National Parks would provide exactly the type of stimulus needed to lead fragile rural areas out of the current crisis towards future prosperity.  

Unfinished Business

In 2006-2007 the then Scottish Executive prepared proposals for a Coastal and Marine National Park, which would have been Scotland’s third.  In 2008 Harris residents voted in favour of their island becoming a National Park.  In 2013 APRS and the Scottish Campaign for National Parks (SCNP) published our landmark report Unfinished Business which set out why Scotland should have more National Parks and proposed at least seven more:  Galloway; the Borders; Ben Nevis/Glen Coe/Black Mount, a Coastal and Marine National Park centred on Mull; Glen Affric; Harris; and Wester Ross.

Scotland has an incredible wealth of world-class landscapes; to make the most of these, many more should be National Parks. 
 National Parks are ideally placed to lead the way out of the current health crisis towards a better, more prosperous Scotland.  This 20th anniversary would be the perfect time to create more National Parks as a brilliant way to tackle the climate emergency and the nature crisis.
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